Writing Prompt #124

The last handful of writing prompts I’ve shared I’ve wanted to write about but due to the move, and a number of other things, I couldn’t focus. Now that I have my writing mojo back (yay!), I’m compelled to spend a little time on some prompts and craft some new pieces.

Want to join me?

Through the Keyhole
by Rick Harrison

If you’d like to contribute to this week’s writing prompt challenge, or if you’ve been inspired by any of the previous prompts, share a link to your work below or tag me on your blog, and I’ll be happy to repost.

Happy Writing!

Writing Prompt #123

I’m not sure why I’ve been drawn to darker images for prompts recently. I mean, it doesn’t necessarily have to be a menacing story lurking within it’s shadows, but…

I was drawn to the contrast in this image, although I have yet to decide what flash fiction is waiting to be told from it.

What do you see? Are you inspired?

Happy Writing!

Writing Prompt #122

This was another image that immediately struck me with an idea. It’s been happening often, and I have to wonder if my creativity has sat dormant too long and is now ready to be set free.

Even during yoga recently, I had an idea of something to incorporate into a script that I’ve struggled with…a lot. And it wasn’t just a whiff of an idea, it was an instigator for the 3rd Act.

If you’ve been struggling with your own writing, give the Writing Prompt Challenge a try and mix things up. Who knows, maybe you’ll find a bit of inspiration by giving your mind a distraction.

Feeling inspired?

Happy Writing!

Writing Prompt #121

Sort of interesting that the first prompt of 2021 ends in 21, right? Just me? Well, I have a thing for numbers…

I had an idea immediately upon reading this so it was easy to decide to share this for today’s writing prompt.

daughters of eden ideas | book series | girls with magic in their veins | @mpilarcruz

If one of your “resolutions” is to write or write more, I hope you’ll join me in the Writing Prompt Challenge. Be sure to share a link to your work in the comment section, and I look forward to seeing what you create!

Happy Writing!

Flashback Friday #1: Routine

500 followers uploaded by Inès on We Heart It

My post on “writing a TV pilot” was my 500th; a milestone I should have reached some time ago. I sort of feel like Bob from the Bob’s Burgers episode “Sacred Cow” (S1E3) in which they celebrate the sale of the 100,000th burger, which should have happened long before, as evident by the dot matrix banner used to commemorate the occasion.

Having reached such a marker, I thought it might be nice to reflect on the posts that have come before, not only as a reflection for myself but also as a learning tool, because as the title of my blog suggests, I have a terrible memory and it would be nice to remember what I’ve come across and shared in the past.

Writing tips are always helpful, and if forgotten, necessary to revisit.

So starting back in the earliest days of my blog, I wrote about routines. As I stated just a few posts ago, I’m working on a new one. How things do come full circle.

September 6, 2013:

In 1932, Henry Miller, the famous writer and painter created a work schedule that listed his “Commandments” for him to follow as part of his daily routine. This list was published in the book, Henry Miller On Writing.

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to “Black Spring.”
  3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  4. Work according to Program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!
  5. When you can’t create you can work.
  6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.
  7. Keep human! See people, go places, drink if you feel like it.
  8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.
  9. Discard the Program when you feel like it—but go back to it next day. Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.
  10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.
  11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

This is what worked for Henry Miller, so keep this in mind when creating a schedule for yourself. You know what parameters you need to work efficiently, so build a plan with those in mind.

I cannot write first thing in the morning. I’m not alert until after my second cup of tea, and then some. I used to write at night, after the world was asleep, but now I’m realizing that my home world is quiet earlier in the day so I need to rethink my plan so that I can be more effective.

Try a new schedule. Tweak where necessary. Try again.

Keep at it and Happy Writing!

How to Write a TV Pilot

Writing a teleplay is quite a bit different from writing a feature…or so I’m learning. With the ever expanding television market in need of fresh content, a screenwriter looking to break in must have a well rounded portfolio.

I hadn’t really given writing for TV much attention prior to the new “golden age” because none of the story ideas I had felt like they could be sustained for multiple episodes over multiple seasons. That was until The Demeter, my sci-fi/space/family drama. As I dug in and got to know my characters and the new world(s) I was creating, the more I realized it could not be contained to a single film, or even two.

I suppose that’s a good measuring stick for a story’s place and purpose.

So I gave my idea a go and wrote a pilot.

After what I was hoping would be my last rewrite, I asked one of my AFF friends to give it a read and offer some feedback*, and goodness, did she deliver. The most useful note I received was that my protagonist had become passive halfway through the script.

I did not see this. And this is why it’s useful to get an outside perspective.

There are a lot of points to hit in any screenplay but in a pilot, it needs to happen quickly. You not only need to introduce your characters, the world, the plot, your voice, where the story is going to go, and your characters’ desires but you also need to do all this in anywhere from 30 to 60 pages. Roughly.

And all while making it unique and interesting and coherent.

When you write a feature you still have all the same boxes to tick but without the need to sustain the story long term, the information given is precisely chosen, and therefore the story is streamlined.

Among the feedback, my friend also sent me this graphic from writer, David Steinberg which is both helpful and maddening.

According to the graphic, there are 10 things your pilot must do or set up in addition to some of what I listed above. Take one of your favorite tv shows and compare the pilot to these necessary elements. Does it hold up? Is anything missing? In light of these elements, or lack thereof, are any of these the reason you tuned in each week?

If you’ve been considering writing a pilot, and you find yourself overwhelmed by all of this information, don’t be put off, like I was initially. Discovering my protagonist had stopped being proactive makes a major rewrite the inevitable next step, and while a crushing blow, a necessity. This is why rewrites are considered the actual writing. They fine tune and make us aware of what’s needed to create a well rounded, compelling story.

I’ll have more tips on this topic in the coming weeks, but if you have any questions in the meantime, please feel free to ask!

Happy Writing!

*With any feedback, it’s important to note that you should take it with a grain of salt, at least until people are paying you for your work. And then you may have to pick your battles. Your story is yours, and while feedback is helpful, pick and choose what best serves your story.

Writing Prompt #117

I like the muted tones of this image. It has an old world quality about it, and I was immediately struck to share it.

The writing prompts have been a wonderful exercise in experimenting with different writing styles and ideas. When I choose to actually follow through. I generally free write, or what I like to call writing “flash fiction”. It’s basically the same thing, I just wanted a more interesting name. And they get me out of my head for a little while, again, when I follow through with the challenge. I’ve written poetry, played with idea of sounds, found pieces that inspire my screenwriting, and the prompts started me down the long, winding path of writing fan fiction. I’m hovering around 135K words right now.

So join me in this week’s Writing Prompt Challenge. Create something and then share it! Free write. Write without any expectations. Create something new or let it help you to rewrite a piece you’ve been struggling with. Whatever you choose, I’d be delighted to see it and share it here too (with your permission, of course)!

Happy Writing!

Writing Prompt #116

who goes there...

I like the idea of images that can be seen in a number of ways. Is this a playful image? Teasing? Or is it of a more somber nature? Menacing?

For this week’s writing prompt challenge, I offer you this. What do you see?

I look forward to seeing your creations!

Happy Writing!