Quote Monday

In the last couple of weeks, I’ve come across a number of articles related to the topic of when to consider giving up on your writing. Most of the titles were decisively click bait but I was intrigued that this was a common theme making the rounds.

It got me thinking about my writing and my shortcomings in regards to my career thus far.

I am now of a particular age in which my job prospects should be more of a priority. I am smart, educated, and capable of doing more than I am currently interested in doing but the thought of a “real” job makes me uncomfortable, in part, because I know that I would have to put those particular obligations above those I value more, because…paycheck.

I want to be a writer (or so I keep saying), and now that we’re settled in our new home in a new state and I have a (mediocre) job lined up, I’ve been able to write. For days. It has been an overwhelming feeling of satisfaction to see the words I’m thinking stream from my fingertips to the screen, especially in light of the barren wordless wasteland I found myself in until now.

I have not given my career a proper chance, and I still have passion, so the thought of giving up is not an option I’ve truly considered. Since reading some of those articles, I did think, “What would it take for me to give up writing?” and could not think of a single thing. I’d like to be considered a professional writer, and I know I would be disappointed should that never happen, but I don’t think I would or could ever give up writing all together.

And neither should you.

If you feel the same.

I’ve taken long breaks, which I always regret, but I perpetually feel the urge to want to write. It’s like a shadow, always lurking in the recesses of my mind, my fingers itching for the feel of the keys beneath them.

Most of the articles ended on a similar note.

Only we can hold ourselves responsible for the goals we set and reach. Only we are capable of writing in our own particular voice, and if we want to keep using our voice, then the thought of giving up shouldn’t even cross our minds because the alternative is silence. Stifling our creativity.

If you’ve been considering calling it quits, really think on it. Ask yourself if you would miss it. Try to remember what it is about writing that you enjoy. Maybe you don’t think you have anything to say – what topics compel you to want to act? Try your hand at a different style. Read.

If after all this you find that you don’t have the desire to continue, only then would I recommend taking a break but I would never suggest giving up. Maybe the passion has fizzled, but I believe if it once existed, it’s likely to return.

And don’t you want to know what happens next?

As a writer, the answer should be a resounding YES!

So should you need more of a pep talk, send me a message. If you have any words of wisdom to share with your fellow writers, please leave a comment below.

Good Luck & Happy Writing!

2021 Resolutions

Premium Vector | 2021 neon sign, bright signboard.

This is the year I’m going to make things happen. We strike a pose and make a fist to emphasize the point.

How many times have we said that?

Looking at a new year in terms of making leaps and bounds towards our goals sounds good, in theory, but in actuality, imagining a whole year to accomplish great things is daunting. 12 months is a big chunk of time. Even though it passes in a blink of an eye. Without periodic check-ins, thinking we have so much time to do everything we want to do generally has the opposite effect and we end up starting grand, petering out, only to approach December in a sort of panic that we didn’t accomplish all we had hoped.

Then the subsequent self admonishment, pity, anger, and false assurances that we’ll do better “next year” begins.

We need to not think about our goals in relationship to the whole year. Instead we need to create more manageable terms, such as what can we accomplish in the next 3 months? After 3 months, we should evaluate, reassess, adjust and move forward for the following 3 months and so on.

By setting short term goals, we can trick our minds into focusing on the task at hand (well, that’s my hope anyway). I do better when I know there’s an external deadline to meet. It’s hard set, not just some self deluded, fanciful idea that I will complete my screenplay without an outside driving force in the next few months – especially when I have an impending move and all that goes with it on the horizon…((panic mode)) – without that deadline, the pressure, I know I will slack off a bit.

And this is where knowing how we best operate is key. In what environment do you best work? At what time? Do you constantly meet your goals or do you play fast and loose? How do you best keep yourself accountable?

I said I would share my resolutions and I will. Every 3 months. I’m looking at these first 3 months skeptically because of the move but it is my hope ((crosses fingers)) that I will finally, once and for all, no-more-rewriting-unless-paid-to-do-so, complete my screenplay Fate(s). I only have the 3rd act to finish and I have it mostly worked out now.

I have other writing resolutions and personal ones too but this year I’m trying my best to temper my ambitions. I always want to do so much, thinking a whole year is plenty of time…I have learned I am wrong.

So thinking on our goals for 2021, I offer you the following three questions I found in an article I read in 2019. I’ve been contemplating them and thought I would share them as part of my resolution post because while goal setting is a fine endeavor, if we don’t want to feel disappointed in our yearly resolutions, maybe we should reevaluate how we define success, for ourselves.

  1. What needs to happen by the end of the year to make it great?
  2. What needs to happen/be accomplished to feel successful?
  3. What will give you validation?

And finally, to end on a note of encouragement, because it doesn’t feel that overwhelming, a word from C. Robert Cargill, a writer I follow on Twitter:

There are 261 working days in 2021. If you write just 1 page every work day, taking holidays and weekends off, you can write at least 2 scripts or 1 novel in 2021. If you write just 2 pages every work day, you can write 5 scripts or 2 novels in 2021.

I hope we all move forward to accomplishing our goals this year. If you’d like to be part of an accountability group or know of one we can all join, please share. I’m thinking of creating something after we settle from the move – a goal for the 2nd quarter.

Happy Writing!

Quote Monday

MM029 - whatever you can do or dream you can, BEGIN IT. boldness has GENIUS,  POWER AND MAGIC in it! - Quote Only - FB 1200x630 - DTK Coaching - Master  Life's Work

We, as writers, have an opportunity, unlike many others to use our voices to say whatever is on our minds in unique and creative ways. We can use allegory or alternate universes to explore ideas or expose unspoken truths.

When I began my writing journey, I wrote fluff. I wrote romances without any substance, or real world experience. I tried writing mysteries without any true suspense. I was young. I didn’t know what I wanted to say or why I wanted to tell a particular story. I just knew I wanted to tell stories.

It wasn’t until I returned to university, after a decent hiatus (from both education and writing), and discovered screenwriting, that I realized I needed to use my words to convey something; that the stories I was investing my time on needed to have depth, purpose.

Whatever creative medium you are using to express yourself, be bold! If you’ve been debating whether to begin something new, marvel at the magic such an idea carries with it. Sometimes, I’ve found that the excitement of a new project brings with it a renewed sense of purpose, and in these trying times, it’s nice to have something to look forward to. And with that energy, perhaps new ideas will form for yet even more stories, or lead you to finishing an abandoned piece, or fixing a plot hole that’s long troubled you. The possibilities are endless.

Happy Writing!

Quote Monday

It’s hard to remain focused on anything right now. There’s a lot to distract. When so much feels out of our control, it’s best to concentrate on that which we can.

I struggled whether or not to share this particular quote this week. I didn’t want it to come off as callous, given the current state of things, but the truth of it is that because so much is going on, we need to carve out some time for ourselves and our work. So this post is meant for those of us in the artistic sphere who already deal with a number of internal and external struggles in their pursuit of being creative.

Anonymous Quote: “Ignore the noise, focus on your work.” (14 wallpapers) -  Quotefancy

This is something I’ve struggled with personally, and because I created this space not only for me, but also for my fellow writers, when I was looking for a quote to share, this one struck me as the right one because I needed to hear it.

I often feel like I need permission to write, especially when there are so many other things that need my attention, but what keeps me sane is my creative outlet and I have to make that a priority.

Set aside time for you and your work, before or after everything else. Create a bubble where you can drown out the background noise and work towards your goals. Use that time as a refuge; a space you look forward to visiting.

As writers and artists, we have the power to use our creativity, our words to draw attention to the things that matter most to us. With everything that’s going on…what do you have to say?

Happy Writing!

The 2020 “One Movie a Week” Challenge (Nearly) Completed

I nearly made it.

But at what cost?

I watched quite a few subpar movies throughout the year, at least that’s how I found many of them, and as you may recall from Part I, I was rather behind in my viewing schedule, by about 3 months = 13 movies. I made up a little bit of the difference by finishing out the year with a string of holiday themed movies…some were better than expected.

I’m sticking to the ABC rating system. And as you’ll see, I fell short by 4 films. Surprising, I know, given it was 2020.

  • 34. Pleasantville – B+
  • 35. Emma (2019) – C
  • 36. Logan Lucky – C
  • 37. The Dead Don’t Die – D
  • 38. Pride (2014) – A
  • 39. Happiest Season – B+
  • 40. Lego Star Wars Holiday Special – B-
  • 41. The Christmas Chronicles – B
  • 42. The Christmas Chronicles 2 – C
  • 43. Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey – A
  • 44. A Bad Moms Christmas – B-
  • 45. Wonder Woman 1984 – C-
  • 46. Holidate – B
  • 47. Last Christmas – B
  • 48. Wonder Woman (2009 Animated) – C

I think my favorite movie of 2020 was Jojo Rabbit by Taika Waititi. It was one of those movies that stuck with me for a few days.

For 2021’s challenge, I plan on being a bit more discerning in my viewing choices. Some of these were just filler, something to put on, but there are so many wonderful movies waiting to be watched, and I shouldn’t waste my limited time on frivolous, add-nothing-to-my-education-of-filmmaking-and-screenwriting type of movies. Well, maybe just one or two, just because.

What was your favorite movie you watched this year? Have any recommendations for my 2021 watch list?

Writing Prompt #121

Sort of interesting that the first prompt of 2021 ends in 21, right? Just me? Well, I have a thing for numbers…

I had an idea immediately upon reading this so it was easy to decide to share this for today’s writing prompt.

daughters of eden ideas | book series | girls with magic in their veins | @mpilarcruz

If one of your “resolutions” is to write or write more, I hope you’ll join me in the Writing Prompt Challenge. Be sure to share a link to your work in the comment section, and I look forward to seeing what you create!

Happy Writing!

First Quote Monday of 2021

Starting off the new year it’s gotta be a good one, right?

I rattled around on Pinterest looking for the best quote to share about goal setting, looking forward, or starting the new year off with purpose and focus, etc. and thought I had settled upon one until I remembered a quote I’ve written down in each of my journals from the talented Phoebe Waller-Bridge, creator of Fleabag.

What would I do if I wasn’t afraid? What would I write if I wasn’t afraid? What would I say in this situation if I wasn’t afraid?

I’ve had a bit of anxiety about a variety of things recently, and while yoga is offering me some peace of mind, taking action requires a fair amount of bravery, in any aspect of our lives. This is why I chose to share this quote. Fear can put a stop to momentum and I can imagine after the past year, we could all use a bit of encouragement to take back the control where we can.

I don’t want to shy away from taking steps to move my life forward. I don’t want to shy away from being bold in my writing. I don’t want to fear taking a risk. I don’t want fear to cause me to miss an opportunity.

I’m putting this out there in the hopes that we can support one another in this creative community. So tell me, in what area of your life do you want to be brave? What’s a goal you’ve been afraid to tackle? Are you ready to conquer! Let’s do it…together!

Here’s to taking on 2021!

The Last Quote of 2020

35 Best Inspirational Quotes About The New Year That Prove 2019 Is Going To Be Your Best Year Yet | YourTango

I always say that I don’t like to make resolutions; that a goal can be set at any time. This is probably because I was like most people who fell off the wagon a couple of months into whatever resolution they had set for themselves. The keyword in that sentence is “was”. I was like that, and yes, I still have my moments, but I’m getting better…well, I try.

A few years ago I realized I hadn’t read a single book all year. Not one. I also realized I hadn’t watched a movie besides those in the MCU or Star Wars that were in theaters that year. What’s that then, maybe three movies? And I want to be a writer – of movies. Sheesh.

Upon this discovery I set two goals/resolutions for the following year: read more and watch more. I started my “one-movie-a-week challenge” which means 52 new movies a year and I use Goodreads to set a reading goal and track my progress. I usually have a few other things I want to do – I still want to learn to sew – and that’s where I tend to fall short. I need to find or create a goal tracker for these other things I’d like to accomplish.

With the longest year ever nearly behind us, there’s a big shining light at the end of the tunnel. If this year has taught us anything it’s that we’re resilient, that time truly is precious, and that we should find and do what makes us happy. I did a lot of soul searching this year and have an idea of the life I’d like to build, and now look to the horizon to make that possible.

So next week I’m going to share my resolutions for 2021 (yep, I’m calling them by their name). And it is my hope that by putting them out into the world, I’ll hold myself accountable. I’ve been thinking that it might be a good idea to create an “accountability team”. If you’d like to be a part of it, I’m going to put out the call, and we’ll work together to follow through on those goals. I hope you’ll join me.

And here’s to 2021. May you bring with you good things.

Flashback Friday #1: Routine

500 followers uploaded by Inès on We Heart It

My post on “writing a TV pilot” was my 500th; a milestone I should have reached some time ago. I sort of feel like Bob from the Bob’s Burgers episode “Sacred Cow” (S1E3) in which they celebrate the sale of the 100,000th burger, which should have happened long before, as evident by the dot matrix banner used to commemorate the occasion.

Having reached such a marker, I thought it might be nice to reflect on the posts that have come before, not only as a reflection for myself but also as a learning tool, because as the title of my blog suggests, I have a terrible memory and it would be nice to remember what I’ve come across and shared in the past.

Writing tips are always helpful, and if forgotten, necessary to revisit.

So starting back in the earliest days of my blog, I wrote about routines. As I stated just a few posts ago, I’m working on a new one. How things do come full circle.

September 6, 2013:

In 1932, Henry Miller, the famous writer and painter created a work schedule that listed his “Commandments” for him to follow as part of his daily routine. This list was published in the book, Henry Miller On Writing.

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to “Black Spring.”
  3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  4. Work according to Program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!
  5. When you can’t create you can work.
  6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.
  7. Keep human! See people, go places, drink if you feel like it.
  8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.
  9. Discard the Program when you feel like it—but go back to it next day. Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.
  10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.
  11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

This is what worked for Henry Miller, so keep this in mind when creating a schedule for yourself. You know what parameters you need to work efficiently, so build a plan with those in mind.

I cannot write first thing in the morning. I’m not alert until after my second cup of tea, and then some. I used to write at night, after the world was asleep, but now I’m realizing that my home world is quiet earlier in the day so I need to rethink my plan so that I can be more effective.

Try a new schedule. Tweak where necessary. Try again.

Keep at it and Happy Writing!

Quote Monday

I’m part of a writer’s group where I’ve seen members question whether or not they think readers will be interested in the subject matter they are writing. I’ve never, personally, understood this way of thinking.

We are our first reader.

We should be engaged by the characters and the world we’re creating. The stories we’re writing should be about topics we’re interested in and want to explore. If we’re not attracted to the idea, why would we waste the time? And if we’re not passionate, the story will read as such.

And if we are, the story will find an audience.

Chasing fads or trends in the tv/movie world is an effort in futility. By the time your story is written and read, the tide will have most likely already turned. This is why many experts suggest avoiding this way of thinking. If you’ve been inspired by the current state of entertainment, then by all means write the story, but write it because you want to, not because you think it’s what you should be.

C. S. Lewis Quote: “Write about what really interests you, whether it is  real things or imaginary things, and nothing else.” (12 wallpapers) -  Quotefancy

This all boils down to finding your voice, and C.S. Lewis said it best. Writing is already a bit of an uphill grind so we should do what we can to ensure that we enjoy the journey – by writing about what you want.

Happy Writing! 😉